Reading Sara Review: Exit West, by Mohsin Hamid

Dear Blog Followers, thank you for your patience as I took a hiatus from blogging as I welcomed a daughter into the world in March. I found that I had plenty of time for reading, but not quite enough time for writing on the blog. I hope now that I am in a routine that I can get back to telling you all about the great (and not as great) books that I have been reading this summer! But keep in mind, I’ll still be slow going on getting reviews up – but will do it when I can!

 

Exit West, by Mohsin Hamid

exit west

Hardcover: 240 pages

Publisher: Riverhead Books; First Edition first Printing edition (March 7, 2017)

Reading Sara Rating: 7/10

modern romance

 

Reading Sara Review: Exit West is a little weird, but I liked it because it was an unexpected love story that had me intrigued from the beginning. When Nadia and Saeed meet, their city is on the brink of civil war. Because of the uncertainty, or perhaps despite it, their relationship and affection grow for each other, and they begin their love affair. I love this quote from the beginning of the book on how they meet, even during the uncertain times.

“It might seem odd that in cities teetering at the edge of the abyss young people still go to class—in this case an evening class on corporate identity and product branding—but that is the way of things, with cities as with life, for one moment we are pottering about our errands as usual and the next we are dying, and our eternally impending ending does not put a stop to our transient beginnings and middles until the instant when it does.” 

As their city becomes increasingly unsafe, they decide to take a chance and walk through a door into a new life. Their story continues with unexpected trials, pursuits, and love. While this particular story is about Nadia and Saeed as migrants, it demonstrates the challenges for all migrants – and our changing world as cultures collide, and people move from the land of their ancestors to find a safe life.

These types of stories always beg the question for me: could I do this? Could I survive with the clothes on my back, unsure of where I was going to sleep most nights, or where my next meal would come from? I’m not sure – but this reminds me that there are people who feel that way tonight, people that are trying to make a home for themselves away from their families and the land that they have known, because of safety. And how can we be compassionate to these migrants? How can we help people feel safe in a place that they do not know? I believe that there are many ways that we can show compassion to refugees and help them.

“and when she went out it seemed to her that she too had migrated, that everyone migrates, even if we stay in the same houses our whole lives because we can’t help it. We are all migrants through time.” –Mohsin Hamid in Exit West

Hamid writes beautifully, and I thought that this story was captivating, surprising, and lovely.

 

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International Women’s Day!

Dearest Readers,

I am sorry that I have been on an unexpected hiatus from this blog. I promise that I have been reading, and have more reviews coming soon (A Gentleman in Moscow, When the Moon is Low, Red Queen Series (1-3), Hillbilly Elegy, and Morning Star to name a few that I am behind on writing reviews for!).

But today I want to celebrate something special: International Women’s Day. This day is especially important to me this year as I get ready to bring a little girl into this world in approximately 3 (!!) weeks. So, before I jump back into reviews, I want to highlight three books that I recommend in honor of women around the world.

Bad Feminist, by Roxane Gay

cover_bad_feminist

I reviewed this last year, and am still a fan. I missed seeing her when she came through my city a couple of months ago – which I regret. She has an incredible voice and ability to bring humor and passion to every issue that she writes about. This is a great feminist starter book!

We Should All be Feminist by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

we should all be feminists

This book takes about 30 minutes to read, so really, no excuse not to read it. Adichie has a classic writing style, and this feminist writing is even more interesting because of her global perspective. A couple of my favorite quotes:
“And this is how we start: we must raise our daughters differently. We must also raise our sons differently”

“My own definition of a feminist is a man or a woman who says, yes, there’s a problem with gender as it is today and we must fix it, we must do better. All of us, women and men, must do better.”

Rad American Women A-Z, by Kate Schatz

rad women a-z

I actually found this book as part of building a library in the nursery (have to start them early on feminism!). But it is definitely a book I would recommend to anyone. I learned about some amazing women that I had never heard of, as well as reminders about some of the incredible women who broke glass ceilings of their own like Billie Jean King, Carol Burnett, and Sonia Sotomayor. These are women that the history books may have missed, but it is so refreshing to be reminded of them and keep their stories alive for future generations.

There are other incredible books about feminism, or the women’s right’s movement in general (I also highly recommend When Everything Changed), but these are my top recommendations if you are in the market for some feminist reading this season!

In closing, I am so grateful for those that came before me and fought for women’s rights. And I promise to continue that fight – for my daughter and the daughters that follow. We owe it to future generations to leave the world better than we found it. And through equal opportunities for all women, I believe that a real difference can be made.

And again, I hope to have more reviews soon – thank you for your patience as I get through my final weeks of pregnancy (and trying to stay awake past 9pm!).

Reading Sara Review: Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

Everything, Everything, by Nicola Yoon

everything everything

Hardcover: 320 pages

Publisher: Delacorte Press (September 1, 2015)

Rating: 7.5/10

everything everything

“Just because you can’t experience everything doesn’t mean you shouldn’t experience anything. Besides, doomed love is a part of life.” – Nicola Yoon, Everything, Everything

Reading Sara Review: Everything, Everything is simple in its premise: a young adult story about a bubble girl, a person isolated from the world – her world is only discovered by reading, conversations with her full-time nurse, and her doting mother. Luckily for the reader, Yoon weaves a story that is so much more than simple. The story is about friendship, first loves, discovery, and forgiveness.

I know people who shy away from young adult novels, but I would encourage those people to give this book a try if you want to dip your toes into the genre. Similar to I’ll Give You the Sun, it has themes that go much deeper and characters that we readers understand through their pain. Critics of this book will say that it is just another cheesy YA love story (ala Fault in Our Stars, Eleanor & Park, etc.). YA literature is not as deep – and this book is not perfect. But it is a quick, lovely story that I highly recommend.

“I was happy before I met him. But I’m alive now, and those are not the same thing.” We get to fall in love with Madeline, our sick, near death central character. And we get to watch her fall in love with Olly, the neighbor who quickly becomes fascinated by the girl in the window that never comes outside. We follow her adventures, her daring challenges, the ups and downs of her relationship with her mom – who has always loved her deeply and protected her above all else.

“Sometimes you do things for the right reasons and sometimes for the wrong ones, and sometimes it’s impossible to tell the difference.”

Everything, Everything is definitely on my list for best books of 2015. Have you read it? I would love to hear your thoughts!

 

 

Weekend Reading Inspiration

To help inspire your weekend, I am pleased to present a few beautiful quotes on reading. I hope that you have an opportunity to find a cozy spot and some quality time to read this weekend!

open book

 “Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.”  Anna QuindlenHow Reading Changed My Life

 “Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad books.” Mary Ann ShafferThe Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“When I look back, I am so impressed again with the life-giving power of literature. If I were a young person today, trying to gain a sense of myself in the world, I would do that again by reading, just as I did when I was young.” Maya Angelou

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, said Jojen. The man who never reads lives only one.”  George R.R. MartinA Dance with Dragons

“The world was hers for the reading.”  Betty SmithA Tree Grows in Brooklyn

These quotes and more lovely, inspirational quotes can be found on http://www.goodreads.com, which truly has the most extensive and wonderful list I have seen!

Do you have favorite quotes about reading? Please, share them!