Reading Sara Review: A Court of Thorns and Roses AND A Court of Mist and Fury, by Sarah J. Maas

A Court of Thorns and Roses and A Court of Mist and Fury, by Sarah J. Maas
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modern romance

Reading Sara Review: I am combining these books because they are the first two in the series (third one coming out in 2017). Like most series, I actually hate it when I can’t just keep reading them – so perhaps should have waited until the third book to begin. Oh well, too late now.

I picked this one up on a whim over a holiday weekend because I had been hearing a lot about it and the second book won the Best Young Adult Fantasy Book on the Goodreads Readers Choice Awards for 2016. I hadn’t read much fantasy this year and thought it would be a fun way to wrap it up. I realize that I am posting this in 2017 – but I finished both books in 2016.

Let me start with: this did not feel like a young adult book to me! Both of these had some pretty darn steamy scenes, so I’m not sure how these books get categorized, but just a warning!

A Court of Thorns and Roses is loosely based on Beauty and the Beast, one of my favorite fairytales. I thought it was creative, fun, and brought my imagination to life. Our heroine, Feyre, kills a wolf in the forest as she is hunting to feed her family. A beast-like creature arrives demanding her life for the life of the wolf, so she is sent to live with him across the wall (parts of this series felt like they were “borrowing” a bit from Game of Thrones, but I’ll let that slide). The beast-creature turns out to be an immortal faerie, who humans were taught to be afraid of. And lucky for Feyre he is a handsome and rich faerie named Tamlin. Tamlin and his people are under a curse, which is revealed throughout the storyline. Her hatred and fear toward the faeries subsides and by the end, she is willing to do anything to save their kind – but especially to save Tamlin from ruin.

There is action, adventure, romance, fighting, a badass female heroine -it has a lot of great pieces for a fantasy story. I definitely enjoyed it.

So, I jumped right into the second because it was a quick read (and I read like I watch movies – I want to know the ending!). It is going to be hard to review the second without any spoilers, so read ahead at your own risk (if you never plan on reading these, it shouldn’t be a problem and perhaps you already stopped reading!).

A Court of Mist and Fury picks up about three months after Feyre has broken the curse on the faerie lands. She is struggling with the guilt of what she had to do, who she had to become, and her new self. Tamlin, unfortunately, is not a calming presence during this time and instead is confining and protecting her rather than letting her breathe and heal. So, lucky for Feyre, she made a deal with the handsome Rhys while Under the Mountain that obligates her to a week with him each month. With Rhys and Tamlin being enemies, this complicates matters in her relationship with both of them.

So, Rhys is dreamy and wonderful – and we quickly discover that he isn’t who everyone thinks that he is. He has wonderful friends and truly helps Feyre heal and learn who she can be with her new powers. My biggest complaint is that it sort of felt like we were supposed to get invested in Feyre and Tamlin in the first book, and then all of sudden hate Tamlin and move on to someone else. The love of Feyre and Rhys was done well, through a deep friendship and connection rather than a classic love triangle, but I still had a difficult time getting on board. I wish that more had been set up in the first book so that I was better prepared. But, by the end, it is impossible not to be on team Rhys.

Beyond the love and friendship, truly why this book was good (and I believe why it got the hype on Goodreads and other outlets) was that Feyre becomes even more badass. She is the female heroine that readers want her to be. She defends herself, her people, her friends and doesn’t rely on a man’s power. She figures out what she believes in, what her destiny is, and follows her heart. In the beginning of the book she is so broken, but Maas does an incredible job of growing the character and letting us see into her mind and soul as she heals. With her flaws, she is an incredibly real character.

I heard rumors of a movie deal for this series – it would be so fun to watch this come alive and see the characters and places of Maas’s imagination (even if they do continue stealing things from GOT, I am ok with that because GOT is awesome). So, if you are in the market for some fantasy (I really don’t know that it is young adult appropriate!), pick this series up. It’s a good one.

 

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